Inspecting a Log Home

Compared to conventional wood stud homes, log homes require additional scrutiny to detect problems that may occur such as: moisture damage, insect infestation, air-infiltration, settling or special construction techniques.  The additional inspection work is summarized below:

 

Log Wall Exterior

The inspector shall inspect exterior surfaces of log walls, when such surfaces are visible, looking for:

  • separation of joints; 
  • the presence of mold, mildew or fungus;
  • loose or missing caulking;
  • discoloration, graying, bleaching or staining of logs;
  • cracks located at tops of logs and facing up;
    the condition of chinking, to include cracking, tears, holes or separation of log courses; and
    the condition of log ends.

Other Exterior Concerns

In addition to the items specified in InterNACHI Standards of Practice 2.1 and 2.2, the inspector shall inspect:

  • vertical support posts under and on all porches
  • downspout extensions; and
  • grading and water flow away from log walls.

 

Log Wall Interior

The inspector shall inspect interior surfaces of log walls, when such surfaces are visible, looking for:

  • separation between log walls and interior ceilings
  • separation between logs, including light or air penetration from outdoors;
  • separation between exterior log wall and interior partition walls.

 

Other Interior Concerns

In addition to the items specified in InterNACHI Standards of Practice 2.4 and 2.6, the inspector shall inspect:

  • adjustable sleeves,  flexible hose sections, looped water supply lines, slip joints, and flexible ductwork that are visible as part of the standard heating and plumbing inspections.

 

 

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